Organic Cardamom Essential Oil


Cardamom

Cardamom essential oil is derived from the genus species elettaria cardamomum. Cardamom essential oil comes from the plants and seeds of a reed-like, perennial herb. The oil has a spicy sweet aroma that is refreshing and uplifting. Cardamom generally grows wild, but is cultivated in Ceylon and in India

Cardamon is used by many to assimilate the emotional and spiritual energies into the mental and physical bodies; and used to find the balance between these two bodies. It is most beneficial to the digestive system, but is also used as a cough remedy, and as a general mood enhancer.

Cardamom is rich in micro nutrients and vitamins that include pyridoxine, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, potassium, sodium, calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, zinc and phosphorous.

History

Cardamon has been used since ancient times. The Egyptians used cardamom in incense and in perfumes. They also chewed it to make their teeth whiter. The Romans used it for indigestion. In Saudi Arabia, cardamom was ground and used in coffee. In the Middle East, Europe and India, Cardamom was referred to as “grains of paradise,” and was considered “chief of all seeds,” by William Cole, a 17th century English herbalist. Valerius Cordus was the first person to distill the essential oil in 1544.

Coffee magnate, Oscar Majus Kloeffer, introduced Indian cardamom (kerala) to cultivation in Guatemala prior to World War I. As of the year 2000, Guatemala had become the largest producer and exporter of cardamom in the world, followed by India.

The unripened fruit of the cardamom plant is used to create the essential oil, via steam distillation of the seeds.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

To use:

Apply topically or diffuse to affect clear breathing. Added to salads, smoothies, bread or meat, cardamom essential oil can be used to aid digestion and to enhance the flavors of the food. Inhale or diffuse cardamom essential oil to achieve a sense of mental clarity and openness.

Directions for Use:

To use topically, apply one to two drops of cardamom essential oil to the preferred area. Dilute with carrier oil to minimize skin sensitivity. For internal use, dilute a single drop in 4 ounces of water, juice or other liquid. To diffuse, place from three to four drops in a nebulizer or diffuser.

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

How to use:

Apply topically or diffuse to affect clear breathing. Added to salads, smoothies, bread or meat, cardamom essential oil can be used to aid digestion and enhance the flavors of the food. Inhale or diffuse cardamom essential oil to achieve a sense of mental clarity and openness.

To use topically, apply one or two drops of cardamom essential oil on the preferred area. Dilute with carrier oil to minimize skin sensitivity. For internal use, dilute a single drop in four ounces of water, juice or other liquid. To diffuse, place from three to four drops in a nebulizer or diffuser.

Therapeutic Properties

  • Antispasmodic
  • Tonic
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    Antiseptic
  • Carminative
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    Stomachic
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    Cephalic
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    Digestive aid
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    Expectorant
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    Stimulant

Blending with Cardamom:

  • Cedarwood
  • Rose
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    Bergamot
  • Caraway
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    Cloves
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    Orange

Allergic reactions and precautions

There are very few allergens and precautions associated with the use of cardamom essential oil, so common sense applies. The possibility of skin sensitivity exists, so it is best to apply with a carrier oil.

The substance should be kept out of the reach of children. Woman who are nursing, pregnant, or who are under the care of a physician should consult their doctors prior to use. Users should avoid contact with any sensitive areas of the body, including the inner ears and eyes.

Cardamom essential oil is derived from the genus species elettaria cardamomum. Cardamom essential oil comes from the plants and seeds of a reed-like, perennial herb. The oil has a spicy sweet aroma that is refreshing and uplifting. Cardamom generally grows wild, but is cultivated in Ceylon and in India.

Cassia Essential Oil and Chinese Herbal Medicine


Cassia Essential Oil

The word, “cassia” is derived from Hebrew "quddah,” meaning “bark like cinnamon,” or "amber.” It is also derived from the Greek word, "kasia,” which means trees resembling acacias. Cassia essential oil is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties. It is frequently used in various spiritual practices in work that involves protection, consecration and the development of psychic connections.

Cassia essential oil comes from the same genus (Cinnamomum cassia) as cinnamon, and is therefore, thought of as a “hot oil.” For this reason, it is usually used in oil blends rather than on its own. The oil is often substituted for cinnamon.

Cassia oil comes from an evergreen tree that originated in the South of China, where it is currently cultivated, along with locations in southern and eastern Asia. According to Xi-wen, et al, (2013) Cassia bark is used as a flavoring agent for meats, desserts and pastries, and is also used in curry recipes.

History

Historically, cassia essential oil was used for a natural remedy to support a healthy immune system. According to the Torah, cassia oil was used by Moses when he anointed the Ark of the Covenant.Cassia is one of the top 50 herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been used as such for centuries.

The plant's buds are used as a spice, and were once used by the ancient Romans, who used it as wine flavoring and incense.Cassia oil is extracted from the bark, leaves, stalks and twigs of the tree by steam distillation.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

Uses for Arborvitae Essential Oil

Traditionally, cassia essential oil is used in Chinese herbal medicine, particularly in vascular disorders. Cassia oil is reported to be effective in improving digestive, cardiovascular, genito-urinary, immune system disorders and circulation.

It is also known to deliver effects in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, fever, blood circulation, depression, joint pain, strengthening hair roots, muscles and gums, fighting microbial infections.

Therapeutic Properties

According to Dr. Joseph Mercola, alternative medicine proponent and osteopathic physician,

the therapeutic properties of cassia essential oil are:

It is also known to deliver effects in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, fever, blood circulation, depression, joint pain, strengthening hair roots, muscles and gums, fighting microbial infections.

  • Anti diarrhea
  • Carminative
  • Antiemetic
  • Antimicrobial
  • Antiviral

Cassia essential oil has many benefits with regard to the digestive system. Serving as an anti-diarrhea agent is one. The oil can be used to stop diarrhea episodes by binding the bowels. Since it is also an antimicrobial agent, it can also effectively treat diarrhea that is caused by microbial action. The effect of this cassia oil helps lift the mood and fight depression.

The oil is also effective in the treatment of nausea, and works to help stop vomiting by inducing a refreshing feeling that drives away the sensations that bring on nausea.

Blending with Cassia

The oils that blend best with cassia essential oil are:

  • Various citrus oils
  • Rosemary
  • Black peppercorns
  • Caraway
  • Balsam
  • Chamomile
  • Ginger
  • Corriander
  • Nutmeg
  • Geranium
  • Frankincense

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

Women who are pregnant should avoid using cassia essential oils, nor should it be used on small children or infants. Undiluted, the oil should not be used on the skin, as it is a mucus membrane irritant, a dermal irritant and dermal sensitizer. Excessive inhalation of cassia essential oil may induce depression or insomnia in certain individuals.

The word, “cassia” is derived from Hebrew “quddah,” meaning “bark like cinnamon,” or “amber.” It is also derived from the Greek word, “kasia,” which means trees resembling acacias. Cassia essential oil is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties. It is frequently used in various spiritual practices in work that involves protection, consecration and the…