Liquid Sunshine


Lemon Essential Oil

According to Forbes Magazine, worldwide interest in using lemons is experiencing a steady increase. According to Google Trends, the most popular search terms used in association with lemons, are "lemon and water" and "lemon in water." Typical uses include using it as a garnish, in cooking, as a naturally active cleaning agent and in health and beauty regimes. However, Lemon Essential Oil has recently achieved its gains in popularity. For instance, the oil is favored by people who spend a lot of time outdoors, as it provides needed bursts of energy, and is also used to purify water and is useful as a hand sanitizer.

A lemon tree can potentially produce from 500-600 pounds of fruit annually. Typically, a 15 ml bottle of Lemon Essential Oil requires the oil from approximately 45 lemons to fill it. The oil's primary chemical components consist of a-terpinene, a-pinene, b-pinene, camphene, sabinene, myrcene, limonene (a powerful anti-cancer antioxidant), Linalool, b-bisabolene, trans-a-bergamotene, neral, and nerol.

"Liquid Sunshine"

People often refer to Lemon Essential Oil as “liquid sunshine,” because of its bright yellow color and invigorating aroma. Among its many uses, the oil is popular oil aromatherapy treatments for stress relief, anxiety, and for the treatment of physical and mental fatigue. It can also help with cognitive function and concentration.

More and more businesses are embracing the practice of diffusing Lemon Essential Oil in the workplace after a Japanese study (2008), suggested that its presence eliminated work-related errors by as much as 54%. An additional Japanese study that was published in Nutritional Neuroscience (2009), indicated that lemon pure essential oil worked to improve the memory of subjects who were impaired with dementia. Similar controlled studies are being conducted throughout the United States in medical centers, hospitals and in assisted living centers where there are high incidences of impaired memory among residents. In addition to working as a memory improvement aid, it has also been shown to help eliminate some of the symptoms of depression.

Lemon Essential Oil is also used for its benefits to skin and hair. It can also be used to treat kidney stones and various fungal infections.

History

Lemon Essential Oil comes from the familiar yellow fruit that grows on trees in warm climates. Early Romans referred to it as “median fruit.” The first historical, literary references to lemons were made in a 10th century Arabic piece about farming. Lemon trees are believed to have first been cultivated in India. Through the years, they began a slow journey throughout Europe and the Middle East, via trade and migration. The tree was first cultivated for commercial use in the Mediterranean region around the year 1150. However, the fruit of the lemon tree was not embraced for culinary use until the 15th century.

Christopher Columbus introduced lemon tree seeds to Hispaniola in 1493, where they were planted for medical and ornamental purposes. By the mid-1700s, the trees were being commercially cultivated in California. They arrived in Florida in the 1800s. However, that state stopped producing lemons after a particularly treacherous freeze in 1894.

In the early 1930s, the Principal and Founder of a famous medicinal and commercial herb school in England, Maude Grieve, stated in a book about herbal medicine, that she considered the lemon the most valuable fruit for preserving health. However, at that time, she did not recognize the valuable properties inherent in its oil.

Today, lemons are commercially grown in Brazil, Argentina, China, India, Mexico, Iran, Italy, Turkey, Spain, and in the United States. Each of these countries produces Lemon Essential Oil. The fruits are harvested by hand under specific standards and are usually picked while they are still green. As the lemons are transported to oil production facilities or stores, they slowly go through the process of turning their familiar yellow color.

How is Lemon Essential Oil extracted?

Lemon oil is extracted from the fresh fruit peel by the cold expression method. The peel contains the highest concentration of nutrients, regarding fat-soluble phytonutrients.

What is cold expression?

Cold oil expression involves a process in which the skins of either whole fruit, or just the fruit peel, are punctured, and the essential oil is pressed out. With this method, a small amount of juice is also extracted, which is later separated from the essential oil.

Uses for Lemon Essential Oil

Lemon Essential Oil has a wide array of uses that include, but are not limited to:

Respiratory treatment 

When used with a diffuser, Lemon Essential Oil can contribute toward the cessation of wheezing, colds, cough and other problems of the upper respiratory system.

Throat treatment

When added to warm water and honey, Lemon Essential Oil can help quell a sore throat, slow a cough and eliminate fever. Its bacteria fighting properties are joined by anti-virus properties to add double protection.

Fungicide

Lemon Essential Oil is an effective treatment for nail fungus. Regular application can also help stop its occurrence. 

Calmative agent 

When used with a diffuser, or in a hot bath, Lemon Essential Oil can calm the nerves and instill a feeling of peaceful calm. 

Clarity of thought/concentration

Diffuse Lemon Essential Oil to result in clearer thinking and an increase in the ability to concentrate.

Teeth whitening agent

Mix baking soda, Lemon Essential Oil, and coconut oil to form a paste. Rub on teeth for approximately 2 minutes and then rinse.

Weight loss support

Placing two drops of Lemon Essential Oil in drinking water three times daily can support metabolism and weight loss.

Immune system support

Lemon Essential Oil supports lymphatic drainage and assists in helping overcome colds quickly. Mix it with coconut oil and apply to the neck area.

Complexion wash

Use Lemon Essential Oil to nourish the skin deeply. To make a natural acne free face wash, mix the oil with baking soda and honey.

Nausea and vomiting

Diffused and inhaled, Lemon Essential Oil can work to cease feelings of nausea and vomiting rapidly.

Diabetes

The Central Food Technological Research Institute in India found that geraniol, an ingredient found in Lemon Essential Oil, is useful in the reversal of diabetic neuropathy.

Other uses for Lemon Essential Oil:

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    Toothbrush sanitizer
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    Toilet bowl cleaner
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    Body cleanser
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    Insect repellent
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    Disinfectant
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    Flavor enhancer
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    Food preservative
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    Treatment for dandruff
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    Hair shine
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    Nail care
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    Residue remover
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    Wood polish
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    Laundry freshener
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    Odor eliminator and air freshener
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    Callous remover
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    Treatment for allergies and hay fever
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    Runny nose
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    Energy booster
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    Halitosis (bad breath)
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    Minor wounds
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    Canker sores
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    Psoriasis
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    Glass cleaner
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    Kitchen disinfectant
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    Air freshener
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    Prolong shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables

How to Use Lemon Essential Oil

The Central Food Technological Research Institute in India found that geraniol, an ingredient found in Lemon Essential Oil, is effective in the reversal of diabetic neuropathy. 

Aromatically in a diffuser
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    Affects mood
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    Cleanses the air
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    Opens airways
Topically
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    Quickly absorbs through the skin
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    Full body benefit
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    Immune support
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    Immediate comfort

Apply a few drops directly on the skin with a carrier oil, and rub in.

Internally 
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    Benefits mouth and throat
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    Supports digestive system
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    Supports immunity

Place 1 to 2 drops under the tongue, or mix in a glass of water and drink, or place a drop in an empty capsule and swallow

Allergic reactions and precautions

Lemon Essential Oil can result in a possible skin sensitivity to sunlight. Therefore, one should wait at least 8-12 hours after applying it to experience full sun exposure.

Even though Lemon Essential Oil is classified as non-toxic, like any essential oil, its potency can be diluted with any carrier oil, such as almond, coconut or olive oil, for those with sensitive skin.

It is crucial to keep Lemon Essential Oil away from children. Women who are under a doctor's care, pregnant, nursing, are advised to consult their physicians before using Lemon Essential Oil. One should avoid contact with eyes, inner ears, and sensitive areas when using this oil.

Resource links

http://sallysorganics.com/lemon/lemon-history/

http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/increase-your-focus-memory-productivity-lemon-essential-oil-research

Fukumoto, S., Morishita, A., Furutachi, K, et al (2008) Effects of flavour components in Lemon Essential Oil on physical or psychological stress. Stress & Health, V24, Issue 1, 3-12

Components of lemon essential oil attenuate dementia induced by scopolamine
Wenjun Zhou, Syuichi Fukumoto & Hidehiko Yokogoshi
Nutritional Neuroscience Vol. 12 , Iss. 2, 2009 

https://www.doterra.com/US/en/blog/spotlight-lemon-oil

http://www.stockpilingmoms.com/2013/04/34-uses-for-lemon-essential-oil/

http://www.stockpilingmoms.com/2013/04/34-uses-for-lemon-essential-oil/

Trasad, SN Muralidhara, (2014), Protective effects of geraniol (a monoterpene) in a diabetic neuropathy rat model: attenuation of behavioral impairments and biochemical perturbations, Journal of Neuroscience Research, Sept; 92(9)1205-16.
http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/general-health-articles/lemon-essential-oil/

Trieu, R (2014) Lemon Craze: Consumption Up 150% Globally In Growing Economies, Forbes Business, August 8, 2014. Retrieved August 11, 2017, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/rosatrieu/2014/08/08/lemon-craze-consumption-up-150-globally-in-growing-economies/#2a6cd2644191

History of Lavender Lavandula


Lavender

Lavandula, or Lavender, is a powerfully aromatic shrub that is part of the Lavandula angustifolia subspecies Angustifolia, or the subspecies Pyrenaica, commonly referred to as the mint family. It's most widely cultivated species is Lavandula angustifolia, curiously known as English Lavender, although the species is not native to England. The plant is also known as garden lavender. Lavender is one of the most widely used of the essential oils. The lavender plant is best known for its multiple uses, its pleasant floral fragrance, and its visual beauty.

Lavender shrubs grow as high as 6.6 feet tall. Its evergreen leaves are generally from 0.79 to 2.36 inches long, and up to .24 inches broad. The flowers of the lavender plant are a pinkish-purple color that is named after the plant. The flowers are produced on spikes that are approximately 3.15 inches long at the top of slender stems that do not have leaves.

While best known as an ornamental plant, this hearty shrub is used as a herbal medicine, either in the form of herbal tea or as lavender oil. Its flowers are sometimes used as a culinary herb that is included in the French blend, herbes de Provence. 

Lavender Oil History

Lavender was first used for medicinal purposes in India, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, some 2500 years ago. It was referred to as “nardus” or “nard” by the ancient Greeks, after the city of Naarda in Syria. The plant was revered as a holy herb, and was used in holy essences, referred to as “spikenard,” in the Bible, and is believed by Biblical scholars to have been used on the infant Jesus, and as an anointment after the crucifixion in preparation for his burial.

Decorative urns containing lavender residues were found in Egyptian tombs, where the herb was used in the Egyptians mummification process.

During the Renaissance, lavender was used during the Plague to protect people against infections. Lice carried the disease on rats, and lavender was used for its effective insect repellent properties.

It was also used during the Victorian Era, when Queen Victoria appointed Sarah Sprules, as its official purveyor. Furniture and floors were washed in lavender, and the linens were perfumed with its scent. Its popularity quickly spread among wealthy English women who would scent themselves and their homes with the sweet scent. As its demand grew, it began to be cultivated through commercial farms to help maintain its supplies.

The lavender used today was rediscovered by one of the founders of aromatherapy, who had burned himself, and plunged his arm into the lavender essential oil. He noted that the wound quickly healed, did not become infected, and did not scar. Lavender was also used during WWI, as an antibacterial dressing for wounds when soldiers would present with injuries.

The word Lavender comes from the Latin “lavare,” which means “to wash”. Today, its largest producer is Provence, France. It is also commercially grown in the United States, Canada, Bulgaria, Australia, Japan, Spain, Russia, and in the Netherlands. It is generally distilled using the steam method of distillation.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Lavender is distilled using the straight steam method. This method involves forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the essential oil. The steam is used to rupture the membranes in the plant, which releases the oil. The oil travels to a condenser where the lighter essential oil separates and floats to the top. The water is removed from the mixture and used as a hydrosol or floral water. The oil becomes essential oil.

Uses for Lavender Essential Oil:

A few drops of lavender oil can be added to virtually any recipe to enhance the flavor of the food. People add it to lemonade or tea, to cookies and other desserts, to salad dressings and to many other foods to impart a rich, herbal overtone that boosts the natural flavors of the ingredients. 

In addition to being used as a culinary addition, Lavender essential oil can be used to enhance beauty products, such as shampoos, hair rinses, body scrubs, massage oils and beauty creams. It can be used as a natural deodorant, insect repellent, and as an antibacterial cleanser. Lavender also has many different therapeutic uses. The oil can be ingested internally in capsules, diffused or rubbed onto the body, as needed.

It can be used therapeutically for the following purposes:

  • Pain relief
  • Mental clarity
  • Arrythia
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Bruises
  • Burns
  • Diaper rash
  • Ear infection
  • Gardia
  • Heat Stroke
  • Insomnia
  • Itching
  • Measles
  • Poison ivy
  • Rash
  • Skin allergies
  • Sunburn
  • Anti-fungal agent
  • Calming agent
  • Sleep aid
  • Pain relief
  • Promotion of respiratory health
  • Improvement of digestion
  • Insect bites
  • Cold sore
  • Dandruff
  • Hay fever
  • Chapped lips
  • Dry skin
  • Nosebleed
  • Motion Sickness
  • Eczema
  • Dermatitis
  • Minor cuts and scrapes
  • Minor burns
  • Bee stings


A 2009 study published in the Journal of Peri-anesthesia Nursing found that lavender essential oil could effectively reduce preoperative anxiety as a simple, low risk, cost-effective intervention with the potential to improve preoperative outcomes, and increase patient satisfaction.

Another study, published in Perspectives in Public Health, found that lavender essential oil helped patients who suffered from stress-related disorders and that it encouraged the healing process by causing the patients to relax, thus, relieving the stress.

The study stated that essential oils, in general, have an effect on brainwaves and can also alter behavior. The effects of the oils are most likely transmitted through the brain through the olfactory system.

Betts, Fox, Rooth, and MacCallum (1995) found that lavender oil was effective in treating Epileptic seizures.

Buckles (1993) published evidence that lavender essential oil works to calm pregnant women in childbirth. An article in Modern Midwife (1995) noted lavender essential oil's effectiveness in perineal repair after childbirth.

How to Use Lavender Essential Oil

Aromatically

  • Affects niid
  • Cleanses the air
  • Opens airways

Topically

  • Quickly absorbs through the skin
  • Full body benefit
  • Immune support
  • Immediate comfort

Apply a few drops directly on the skin and rub in.

Internally

  • Benefits mouth and throat
  • Supports digestive system
  • Supports immunity

Place 1 to 2 drops under the tongue, or mix in a glass of water and drink, or place a drop in an empty capsule and swallow.

PLEASE remember to check if the brand and type of essential oil you have can be used internally before using it.


Lavender allergic reactions and precautions:

According to the National Institutes of Health online medical encyclopedia Medline Plus, the most common symptoms of an allergic reaction to lavender include a skin rash, headache, burning sensations in the throat or eyes, blurred vision, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, difficulty breathing and chills. Should any of these symptoms present themselves, one should seek immediate medical assistance. 

Resource links

World Checklist of Selected Plant Families: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew". kew.org.


http://www.lavendersense.com

"Lavandula angustifolia". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 28 July 2017.

http://everything-lavender.com

https://www.mindbodygreen.com


The use of the essential oil lavandin to reduce preoperative anxiety in surgical patients
R Braden, S Reichow, MA Halm - Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, 2009 


Essential oils and 'aromatherapy': their modern role in healing 
M. Lis-Balchin
First Published October 1, 1997 


Betts T., Fox C., Rooth K. and MacCallum R. (1995). An olfactory countermeasure treatment for Epileptic seizures using a conditioned arousal response to specific aromatherapy oils. Epilepsia; 36(suppl 3), S130


Buckle J. (1993). Does it matter which lavender oil is used? Nurs Times; 89(20), 32-35 Burns E. and Blamey C. (1994). Using aromatherapy in childbirth. Nurs Times; 90, 54-58 Google Scholar


Cornwell S. and Dale A. (1995). Lavender oil and perineal repair. Modern Midwife; 5, 31-33 


http://www.livestrong.com


Essential Oil Usage Guide -A-Z – Doterra Inc.


Pure Organic Frankincense Oil


Boswellia Serrate

Frankincense essential oil is one of the most highly prized oils in existence. It has a soft, comforting aroma, and has been used throughout history to treat many different conditions. 

History of Frankincense a Universal Essential Oil

Frankincense, otherwise known as boswellia serrate, was highly valued by ancient civilizations, and was reserved for the most sacred religious practices and healing arts. Perhaps the most famous associations with frankincense comes from the traditional Christmas story, in which the Three Wise Men presented the Christ child with gifts that included it. However, few people understand its wider significance in the establishment of trade routes between Asia and Europe.

Frankincense begins as a resinous sap that comes from a specific species of trees that grow in the South of the Arabian Peninsula. During certain seasons, the trees are trimmed with special knives in order to allow the sap to ooze out. The sap is left to dry in the sun. Once completely dry, it can be used. Harvested frankincense is burned as incense, but has many other uses as well. Because of its high demand, the kingdoms of southern Arabia became an important part of the global economy. 

Today, virtually all frankincense hails from the western art of Oman, where it is used for many different things, from drink flavorings to toothpaste. Its modern day incarnation is distilled using steam distillation. 

What is steam distillation?

Steam distillation is a specific type of a separation process or distillation that is used for temperature sensitive compounds, such as natural aromatic materials. At one time, it was used by scientists to purify organic compounds, but because of the invention of vacuum distillation, it is no longer used for this purpose.
Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil. 

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result. 

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

Uses for Frankincense Essential Oil

According to Dr. Jockers, frankincense essential oil can be used in the following ways:

  • Balance hormones
  • Alleviate respiratory issues
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Reduce the risk of cancer
  • Relieve stress
  • Boost immunity
  • Promote sleep
  • Fight oral infections
  • To nourish skin
  • Acne prevention
  • Relief of digestive issues
  • Soap making


Frankincense essential oil is used as a remedy for reducing unpleasant symptoms associated with menstruation and menopause. It works by balancing the hormonal levels that lead to problems such as fatigue, anxiety, headaches and mood swings. The oil is also used to reduce the risk of tumors in premenopausal women. Because of its antidepressant and anti-anxiety abilities, frankincense tends to induce feelings of relaxation and peace.

Frankincense oil is used as a natural treatment for respiratory issues . Coughs are soothed by the aroma of the essential oil, by the elimination of phlegm that becomes deposited in the respiratory system. Boswellic acids are present in frankincense oil, which prove to be effective in the treatment of inflammatory and pain related conditions that concern the tendons, muscles and joints. In his study published in the Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Siddrqui, (2011) reports that the boswellic acids present in frankincense suppress the production of inflammatory molecules that are related to many different conditions, such as painful bowel disorders and arthritis. 
In a study conducted by Hamidpour, et al (2013), the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine reports that frankincense oil contains anti-tumor properties and triterpenoids that help kill the cells that cause cancer. 

Ismail, et al (2014) also report that frankincense oil contains antimicrobial properties that assist in the destruction of infection causing ciruses, fungus and bacteria. The essential oil not only prevents germs from forming on the skin and mouth It also supports the body's fight against infections and boosts the immune system. 

Used as a sleep aid, frankincense essential oil lowers stress levels, anxiety and nervous energy, enabling one to fall asleep quickly, naturally and deeply. Its calming and soothing aroma help the body to reach its ideal state of sleep, resulting in a feeling of more fulfilling rest. 

According to Dr. Jockers, frankincense oil contains antiseptic benefits for use in the prevention of bad breath, gingivitis, cavities, toothaches, mouth sores and other oral issues. Dr. Jockers further notes that frankincense oil can also help prevent acne and premature signs of aging, such as scars, blemishes and wrinkles.

Studies conducted by the Peninsula Medical School, and the Universities of Exeter and Plymouth confirm that frankincense can also be used to treat digestive issues. It works by improving circulation, which is important for keeping the digestive tract healthy, and also by relaxing the mucles in the digestive tract, and by accelerating secretion of digestive enzymes. 

Frankincense essential oil is often blended with:

  • Lime
  • Lemon
  • Wild Orange
  • Cypress
  • Lavender
  • Rose
  • Sandalwood
  • Yland Ylang
  • Clary Sage
  • Geranium

Allergic reactions and precautions

Livestrong.com reports that according to the Physician's Desk Reference, Gastrointestinal side effects are possible when taking frankincense oil. It also has blood thinning effects that can increase the rick of abnormal bleeding. This is only of concern for individuals who have bleeding disorders, or for persons taking medications with anticoagulant properties. Although rare, some cases of allergic reactions have been reported with the use of frankincense oil. The PDR lists hives, rash or itchy swollen skin as the symptoms. 

Siddiqui, M. Z. (2011). Boswellia Serrata, A Potential Antiinflammatory Agent: An Overview. Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 73(3), 255–261. http://doi.org/10.4103/0250-474X.93507

Hamidpour, R., Hamidpour, S., Hamidpour, M., & Shahlari, M. (2013). Frankincense (乳香 Rǔ Xiāng; Boswellia Species): From the Selection of Traditional Applications to the Novel Phytotherapy for the Prevention and Treatment of Serious Diseases. Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 3(4), 221–226. http://doi.org/10.4103/2225-4110.119723

Ismail, et al, International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences
ISSN: 2319-7706, Volume 3, Number 10, (2014) pp.1095 – 1101

Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Exeter EX2 4NT, UK. 

Cedarwood Essential Oil Benefits and History


Cedarwood

Cedarwood essential oil comes from the oil of cedars of Lebanon trees that grow in Morocco. The oil from the trees is a syrupy, yellow, balsamic oil with a scent resembling turpentine, but that is a hint sweeter and more agreeable.

Cedarwood essential oil is known for being a comforting oil that possesses a wood-like pleasant scent. It is used to add a warm tone to any blends of colognes, perfumes or oil mixtures. Cedarwood is also thought by essential oil practitioners to bring people together and to improve their personal outlooks and self-esteem.

Cedarwood oil consists of:

  • Terpenic
  • Hydrocarbons
  • Cedro
  • Cadinene

History

During the first and second centuries, Galen and Dioscorides mentioned “cedrium” a species of tree whose resin was used to preserve bodies. This was later shown to be cedars of Lebanon. In 1698, the therapeutic nature of cedarwood's resinous matter was mentioned by Nicolas Lemery, who described it as a pulmonary and urinary antiseptic. Research conducted after that time confirmed the oil's therapeutic properties. In 1925 France, Doctors Gilbert and Michael recorded the satisfactory results that were obtained by using cedarwood oil in cases of chronic bronchitis.

The ancient Sumerians would use cedarwood oil as a base for paint making, while ancient Egyptians used it for embalming, as well as for cosmetic purposes. Sumerians would produce blue pigment by grinding cedarwood and cobalt compounds in a mortar and pestle. As part of the same process, they obtain green from copper, black from charcoal, yellow from lead antimonite, and white from gypsum. 

Cedarwood oil is obtained via the steam distillation process from pieces of cedar wood.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil. 
Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.
The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

Uses for Cedarwood Essential Oil:

Some of the most popular uses of cedarwood essential oil are:

  • Promotes hair growth
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Toothache treatment
  • Gum Strenghtener
  • Reduction of skin irritations
  • Anti fungal
  • Bug repellant
  • Acne cure
  • Cough Suppressant
  • Metabolism Stimulant
  • Menstruation regulator
  • Muscle tightener
  • Detoxifier
  • Used in soap making


When mixed with rosemary and lavender essential oils, cedarwood oil can reduce hair loss up to 44%, and is often used to treat alopecia. By inhaling cedarwood oil, or using it externally on the skin, inflammation is reduced, which, in turn minimizes joint stiffness.

Cedarwood has a partial numbing and antiseptic effect which is effective in the treatment of toothaches. It is also good for strengthening the gums. The same antiseptic effect makes cedarwood an excellent treatment for the reduction of skin irritations, such as acne. It's anti fungal properties make it a good choice for the treatment of athlete's foot.

The astringent properties of cedarwood essential oil enables it to tighten loose muscles to create a feeling of greater firmness. The oil also hardens digestive system muscles, helping with such stomach issues as diarrhea. 

With regard to soap making, cedarwood essential oil is the perfect addition for insecticidal soaps and is also frequently used in men's fragrance blends.

Therapeutic Properties of Cedarwood Essential Oil:

  • Anti fungal
  • Antiseptic
  • Diuretic
  • Astrigent
  • Sedative

Allergic reactions and precautions

Cedarwood essential oil has no reported side effects, but like the majority of essential oils, it is not recommended for use by women who are pregnant, or on children. Certain essential oils can lead to skin irritations or allergic reactions in people who have sensitive skin. Therefore, it is prudent to conduct a patch test prior to using regularly.

History and Benefits of Helichrysum Italicum Essential Oil


Helichrysum

Helichrysum essential oil comes from the Helichrysum italicum plant, which is a member of the Asteraceae plant family, originating in the Mediterranean region. The plant is a small perennial herb with silver, hairy leaves and yellow, ball shaped flowers. It has been used for medicinal purposes for literally thousands of years, especially in countries such as Herzegovina, Bosnia, Turkey, Italy, Portugal and Spain.

Helichrysum has a pungent, full bodied aroma that as been described as smelling, “herbal.” Because of its strength, its aroma can overpower more floral fragrances.

History

Historical information about helichrysum is scant, although the oil does appear to enjoy a history of medicinal and culinary usage in more than one culture.Helichrysum comes from the Greek term, “Helios,” which signifies the sun, and the word, “chrysos,” which means gold.

This refers to the bright color of the flowers. In Africa, it is called, “swewjaartjie,” which is based on the belief that the flower heads last “sewe” (seven) years (jaar).The essential oil of the helichrysum plant is extracted via steam distillation of the flower petals.

What is Steam Distillation?

Steam distillation is a specific type of a separation process or distillation that is used for temperature sensitive compounds, such as natural aromatic materials. At one time, it was used by scientists to purify organic compounds, but because of the invention of vacuum distillation, it is no longer used for this purpose.Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

Uses for Helichrysum Essential Oil

Helichrysum essential oil can be effectively used in the following ways:

  • Antispasmodic
  • Anticoagulant
  • Antiallergenic
  • Anti-hemanic
  • ​Anti-plogiastic
  • ​Anti-inflammatory
  • ​Antitussive
  • ​Nervine
  • ​Febrifuge
  • ​Cicatrisant
  • Expectorant
  • Cholagogue
  • Antimicrobial
  • Antiseptic
  • Emollient
  • Mucolytic
  • Diuretic
  • Splenic
  • Soap Making
  • ​Cytophylactic
  • Hepatic
  • Fungicidal

According to Organic Facts, helichrysum essential oil can be used to both treat and prevent unwanted or excessive body contractions. In cases where people have high cholesterol and blood that is coagulated, it can be used as an anticoagulant to provide immediate relief by liquifying or thinning the blood.

As an anti-hematic, helichrysum essential oil can be used to clear accumulated blood, or blood clots, which appear as the aftermath of hemorrhaging. It works by simulating the enzymes produced by the body that melt away clots. It can also be used in case of an allergenic emergency.

Fever is a symptom that indicates when the immune system is combating an infection or unwanted substance. It accompanies viral infections, colds, baacterial infections and infections from wounds, biols, pox, arthritis or allergic reactions.

Helichrysum essential oil helps to both cure the root cause of the fever, but also works to reduce the fever itself.

As an anti-phlogistic, helichrysum oil can be used to reduce inflammation that sometimes results from a fever. It also helps combat the fatigue that is sometimes associated with fevers. Helichrysum's anti-inflammatory properties work to provide relief from inflammation due to a number of causes, including fever.

People who have a continuous cough can benefit by using helichrysum essential oil, because it is an antitussive. It works best on the types of coughs stimulated by phlegm found in the respiratory tract, as well as those coughs generated by an itchy sensation in the throat. The latter type of cough is caused by infections.

As an expectorant, the oil provides warmth to the respiratory system to loosen phlegm deposits, and prevents new phlegm from being deposited, providing relief from congestion that shows as a sign of illness or infection, or from continuous coughs.

Helichrysum essential oil can help keep the human nervous system in check by strengthening and protecting it from disorders. Its regular use can protect against the types of nervous disorders that occur as people age, and can help reduce anxiety and stress levels.

When cuts and wounds occur on the human body, helichrysum essential oil not only works to heal the wounds quickly. It also helps to heal scars. As an antimicrobial, the oil inhibits the growth of microbes, and protects the body against infection.

It works as an antiseptic to prevent wounds from becoming septic.

As a cholagogue, the essential oil of helichrysum helps neutralize stomach acids, and promotes the release of bile into the stomach. This works to promote digestion and to reduce the symptoms of acidosis.

People who have dry, itchy skin can help make it smooth by using helichrysum essential oil. Its emollient properties helps keep the skin soft and smooth as it helps it to retain moisture.

The oil prevents cracking of the skin and other symptoms of dehydration.

As a fungicidal, helichrysum oil prohibits fungal infections.

As a diuretic, helichrysum oil acts to facilitate urination, both in quantity and in frequency. This help remove toxic substances from the blood. It can also lower the blood pressure, help with weight loss, eliminate fat and aid in digestion. The oil also works as a splenic, to help keep the spleen healthy, and is especially beneficial for those suffering from anemia.

Cell health is enhanced through the use of helichrysum essential oil, which encourages the recycling of dead cells, and the stimulation of new cell production. As a hepatic, it soothes the liver, regulates its discharges, reduces inflammation and protects it from infections.

Helichrysum Essential Oil is often blended with the Following Oils:

  • Ylang Ylang
  • Geranium
  • Petit Grain
  • Sage
  • Rose
  • Neroli
  • Lavender
  • Orange

Allergens and Precautions

There have been no effects concerning Helichrysum essential oil's toxicity or irritating effects. However, since it is an anticoagulant, people who risk chances of internal hemorrhaging (surgery patients) should avoid its use.

People who have a continuous cough can benefit by using helichrysum essential oil, because it is an antitussive. It works best on the types of coughs stimulated by phlegm found in the respiratory tract, as well as those coughs generated by an itchy sensation in the throat…

What Blends Well With Eucalyptus Essential Oil


Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus​ comes from tall evergreen trees, called Eucalyptus radiata, also called Tasmanian Blue Gum Trees, are native to Australia. These trees are the primary food source of koala bears. The primary chemical components of the oil are alpha-terpineol, and eucalyptol. These components make eucalyptus essential oil the ideal oil to promote clear breathing and to open airways. It is also used to create soothing massage experiences.

Eucalyptus is known for its strong, pleasant aroma, and for its purifying properties that can be beneficial for cleansing surfaces and the air, and also for treating skin ailments. 

The Aborigines have used eucalyptus, otherwise known as “kino,” for centuries, to heal most wounds. Studies have shown that Eucalyptus is also effective in helping people relax and relieve tension. Among its many uses, eucalyptus oil can be found in mouth washes used to freshen breath and to promote good oral health.

History

The first noted botanical collections of eucalyptus was historically recorded to have been made by Joseph Banks, Daniel Solander, and James Cook at Botany Bay, New south Wales, Australia, in 1770. Between 1788 and the start of the 19th century, a number of other species of Eucalyptus were named and published by botanist James Smith. 

Today, the eucalyptus oil industry remains an important part of Australian history. It started in 1852, and by the turn of the century was already well established. During the next half century the Australian industry was the major supplier of eucalyptus oil to all major world markets. The production of eucalyptus essential oil has the potential to be both an important rural industry and an interesting tourist attraction.
Today, eucalyptus, ranging from the dwarfed forms, called, “Mallees” to the largest trees, which can be found in Australia's mountainous and coastal regions are classified into more than 600 species. Eucalyptus trees are considered valuable sources of hardwood, as well as valued for their oil. It is distilled using the steam distillation method.

Distillation of Eucalyptus Essential Oil

It takes as much as twelve pounds of eucalyptus twigs and leaves to produce a 50m bottle of eucalyptus essential oil. After harvest, the material is placed into mobile stills and sealed with distillery lids, which are clamped on to assure a proper seal. Steam is connected at the base of the stills, which is used to vaporize the oil.

After being transferred to modern stainless steel condensers, the vapors are condensed into a mixture of water and oil. This mixture is collected and separated. Since the oil of eucalyptus is lighter than water, it floats to the top and is decanted off. The oil yield, on average, is approximately 1% of the harvested materials.


The last step in the distillation process is a re-distillation process that removed impurities and results in an entirely natural, organic product. There is no need for artificial flavorings, aromas or additives, and no pesticides or fertilizers are used in the oil's manufacture. 

Uses for Eucalyptus Essential Oil

Originally referred by to as “eucalyptol” by scientists, the health benefits of eucalyptus oil come from an organic compound called, “cineole”, which has widespread medicinal effects. According to Dr. Axe, of Food is Medicine, eucalyptus essential oil can be used for the following purposes:

  • Flu and colds
  • Nourishment for hair
  • Hand cleaner
  • Treatment of allergies and sinus infections
  • all-natural cleaning products
  • Odor remover
  • Air cleanser
  • Treatment of respiratory problems
  • Treatment of wounds
  • Soap making

According to Dr. Axe, eucalyptus essential oil can be used as an expectorant to help cleanse the body of harmful microorganisms and toxins.

A few drops mixed with a carrier oil also acts as an excellent moisturizer for the hair, which effectively treats dandruff and itchy scalp. It can also be used to treat lice, if chemical treatments are found to be undesirable.

Eucalyptus essential oil is excellent for removing grease and grimes from hands and feet, and can help rejuvenate them when mixed into an epsom salt bath.

According to research conducted by the University of Maryland Medical Center, eucalyptus oil is effective in the treatment of coughs and colds, plaque and gum disease. Further research, conducted by Salari, et al, (2006), found eucalyptus effective for the treatment of respiratory tract disorders.

Natural Living Ideas reports that Eucalyptus Oil is an anti-microbial, which makes it perfect for preventing the spread of viral and bacterial infections. It also works well for general cleaning purposes to clean countertops, floors, cabinets, bathroom fixtures, pet areas, diaper pails and more.In its list of beneficial uses for eucalyptus essential oil, the online medical publication, Healthline, mentions using the oil to clear the chest, to silence a cough, as an insect repellent, to disinfect wounds, to treat asthma and sinusitis, to control blood sugar as a potential treatment for diabetes, to soothe cold sores, to freshen the breath and to ease joint pain.

Healthline further notes that many best selling, over-the- counter creams that are used to soothe pain from conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis contain eucalyptus essential oil. It works by reducing the inflammation and pain that are associated with many related conditions. It is also used for people who experiene back pain, although one should consult a doctor prior to using it.

Eucalyptus essential oil is often blended with the following oils:

  • Chamomile
  • Cedarwood
  • Cypress
  • Geranium
  • Thyme
  • Pine
  • Rosemary
  • Grapefruit
  • Ginger
  • Lavender
  • Juniper
  • Lemon
  • Peppermint
  • Marjoram

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

People who have skin sensitivity should avoid using eucalyptus essential oil, and it should be kept out of reach of children. Consult a physician before use if you are under a doctor's care, are pregnant or nursing.  Avoid contact with sensitive body areas, the eyes and inner ears. Do not use internally.

The Aborigines have used eucalyptus, otherwise known as “kino,” for centuries, to heal most wounds. Studies have shown that Eucalyptus is also effective in helping people relax and relieve tension. Among its many uses, eucalyptus oil can be found in mouth washes used to freshen breath and to promote good oral health.

Organic Cardamom Essential Oil


Cardamom

Cardamom essential oil is derived from the genus species elettaria cardamomum. Cardamom essential oil comes from the plants and seeds of a reed-like, perennial herb. The oil has a spicy sweet aroma that is refreshing and uplifting. Cardamom generally grows wild, but is cultivated in Ceylon and in India

Cardamon is used by many to assimilate the emotional and spiritual energies into the mental and physical bodies; and used to find the balance between these two bodies. It is most beneficial to the digestive system, but is also used as a cough remedy, and as a general mood enhancer.

Cardamom is rich in micro nutrients and vitamins that include pyridoxine, niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, potassium, sodium, calcium, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, zinc and phosphorous.

History

Cardamon has been used since ancient times. The Egyptians used cardamom in incense and in perfumes. They also chewed it to make their teeth whiter. The Romans used it for indigestion. In Saudi Arabia, cardamom was ground and used in coffee. In the Middle East, Europe and India, Cardamom was referred to as “grains of paradise,” and was considered “chief of all seeds,” by William Cole, a 17th century English herbalist. Valerius Cordus was the first person to distill the essential oil in 1544.

Coffee magnate, Oscar Majus Kloeffer, introduced Indian cardamom (kerala) to cultivation in Guatemala prior to World War I. As of the year 2000, Guatemala had become the largest producer and exporter of cardamom in the world, followed by India.

The unripened fruit of the cardamom plant is used to create the essential oil, via steam distillation of the seeds.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

To use:

Apply topically or diffuse to affect clear breathing. Added to salads, smoothies, bread or meat, cardamom essential oil can be used to aid digestion and to enhance the flavors of the food. Inhale or diffuse cardamom essential oil to achieve a sense of mental clarity and openness.

Directions for Use:

To use topically, apply one to two drops of cardamom essential oil to the preferred area. Dilute with carrier oil to minimize skin sensitivity. For internal use, dilute a single drop in 4 ounces of water, juice or other liquid. To diffuse, place from three to four drops in a nebulizer or diffuser.

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

How to use:

Apply topically or diffuse to affect clear breathing. Added to salads, smoothies, bread or meat, cardamom essential oil can be used to aid digestion and enhance the flavors of the food. Inhale or diffuse cardamom essential oil to achieve a sense of mental clarity and openness.

To use topically, apply one or two drops of cardamom essential oil on the preferred area. Dilute with carrier oil to minimize skin sensitivity. For internal use, dilute a single drop in four ounces of water, juice or other liquid. To diffuse, place from three to four drops in a nebulizer or diffuser.

Therapeutic Properties

  • Antispasmodic
  • Tonic
  • angle-right
    Antiseptic
  • Carminative
  • angle-right
    Stomachic
  • angle-right
    Cephalic
  • angle-right
    Digestive aid
  • angle-right
    Expectorant
  • angle-right
    Stimulant

Blending with Cardamom:

  • Cedarwood
  • Rose
  • angle-right
    Bergamot
  • Caraway
  • angle-right
    Cloves
  • angle-right
    Orange

Allergic reactions and precautions

There are very few allergens and precautions associated with the use of cardamom essential oil, so common sense applies. The possibility of skin sensitivity exists, so it is best to apply with a carrier oil.

The substance should be kept out of the reach of children. Woman who are nursing, pregnant, or who are under the care of a physician should consult their doctors prior to use. Users should avoid contact with any sensitive areas of the body, including the inner ears and eyes.

Cardamom essential oil is derived from the genus species elettaria cardamomum. Cardamom essential oil comes from the plants and seeds of a reed-like, perennial herb. The oil has a spicy sweet aroma that is refreshing and uplifting. Cardamom generally grows wild, but is cultivated in Ceylon and in India.

Cassia Essential Oil and Chinese Herbal Medicine


Cassia Essential Oil

The word, “cassia” is derived from Hebrew "quddah,” meaning “bark like cinnamon,” or "amber.” It is also derived from the Greek word, "kasia,” which means trees resembling acacias. Cassia essential oil is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties. It is frequently used in various spiritual practices in work that involves protection, consecration and the development of psychic connections.

Cassia essential oil comes from the same genus (Cinnamomum cassia) as cinnamon, and is therefore, thought of as a “hot oil.” For this reason, it is usually used in oil blends rather than on its own. The oil is often substituted for cinnamon.

Cassia oil comes from an evergreen tree that originated in the South of China, where it is currently cultivated, along with locations in southern and eastern Asia. According to Xi-wen, et al, (2013) Cassia bark is used as a flavoring agent for meats, desserts and pastries, and is also used in curry recipes.

History

Historically, cassia essential oil was used for a natural remedy to support a healthy immune system. According to the Torah, cassia oil was used by Moses when he anointed the Ark of the Covenant.Cassia is one of the top 50 herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine and has been used as such for centuries.

The plant's buds are used as a spice, and were once used by the ancient Romans, who used it as wine flavoring and incense.Cassia oil is extracted from the bark, leaves, stalks and twigs of the tree by steam distillation.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil.

Uses for Arborvitae Essential Oil

Traditionally, cassia essential oil is used in Chinese herbal medicine, particularly in vascular disorders. Cassia oil is reported to be effective in improving digestive, cardiovascular, genito-urinary, immune system disorders and circulation.

It is also known to deliver effects in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, fever, blood circulation, depression, joint pain, strengthening hair roots, muscles and gums, fighting microbial infections.

Therapeutic Properties

According to Dr. Joseph Mercola, alternative medicine proponent and osteopathic physician,

the therapeutic properties of cassia essential oil are:

It is also known to deliver effects in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, fever, blood circulation, depression, joint pain, strengthening hair roots, muscles and gums, fighting microbial infections.

  • Anti diarrhea
  • Carminative
  • Antiemetic
  • Antimicrobial
  • Antiviral

Cassia essential oil has many benefits with regard to the digestive system. Serving as an anti-diarrhea agent is one. The oil can be used to stop diarrhea episodes by binding the bowels. Since it is also an antimicrobial agent, it can also effectively treat diarrhea that is caused by microbial action. The effect of this cassia oil helps lift the mood and fight depression.

The oil is also effective in the treatment of nausea, and works to help stop vomiting by inducing a refreshing feeling that drives away the sensations that bring on nausea.

Blending with Cassia

The oils that blend best with cassia essential oil are:

  • Various citrus oils
  • Rosemary
  • Black peppercorns
  • Caraway
  • Balsam
  • Chamomile
  • Ginger
  • Corriander
  • Nutmeg
  • Geranium
  • Frankincense

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

Women who are pregnant should avoid using cassia essential oils, nor should it be used on small children or infants. Undiluted, the oil should not be used on the skin, as it is a mucus membrane irritant, a dermal irritant and dermal sensitizer. Excessive inhalation of cassia essential oil may induce depression or insomnia in certain individuals.

The word, “cassia” is derived from Hebrew “quddah,” meaning “bark like cinnamon,” or “amber.” It is also derived from the Greek word, “kasia,” which means trees resembling acacias. Cassia essential oil is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties. It is frequently used in various spiritual practices in work that involves protection, consecration and the…

Citrus Aurantium Bergamia Benefits


Bergamot

The distinctive flavor and aroma of world famous Earl Grey tea comes from a wrinkled orange-like fruit called bergamot, or citrus bergamia. The fruit has a notable citrus-like aroma with spicy undertones. This same fruit is used to create a highly acclaimed essential oil, which has many therapeutic benefits. The most prominent reputation for bergamot is its utilization as a calming agent. Therefore, it is frequently used in massage and aromatherapy, and to promote a restful sleep.

History

Used since the 16th century, citrus bergamia, commonly known as bergamot, comes exclusively from the South of Italy in the Calabria region. It is named for the city, Bergamot, in Lombardy. This is the location where bergamot essential oil was originally sold. This oil has been used by the Italians in folk medicine for decades, especially for the treatment of fever.

It has also been shown to be useful for the treatment of skin diseases, respiratory problems, as well as urinary tract and mouth infections. Bergamot essential oil is obtained from the cold expression of the peel of nearly ripe fruit. Bergamot oil is used for both its therapeutic properties and as an ingredient of a fragrant eau-de-cologne. The essential oil used for therapy is cold expressed.

What is cold expression?

The majority of essential oils go through a steam distillation process. However, oils from citrus and other fruit peels are cold expressed. Essential oils that have been cold expressed from citrus fruits are most frequently used for therapeutic oils, while steam distilled oils from fruits are used primarily in the cosmetics industry for colognes and perfumes.

The process of cold expression preserves all of the fruit's aromatic botanical properties. This process entails piercing the skins of either the fruit peel, or the whole fruit, and pressing the essential oil out. By virtue of the methods used to extract the oil, a small amount of juice is also extracted, which is separated from the oil in an additional step.

Uses for Bergamot essential oil:

Bergamot oil has many therapeutic uses. Its high content of the alcohols and chemicals esters make it a gentle oil to use. According to Dr. Axe from Food is Medicine, bergamot essential oil can be used as a mood enhancer and to build confidence. It can be used to kill bacteria, minimize freckles, sum spots and other marks on the skin, and to heal scars.

The oil is an:

  • Antidepressant
  • Diuretic
  • Stimulant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antidepressant
  • Tonic
  • Deodorant
  • Analgesic

Other health benefits and therapeutic uses for bergamot essential oil:

  • Cough reduction
  • Stress reduction
  • Kills bacteria and germs
  • Cleans oily skin
  • Sedative
  • Soothes skin irritations
  • Digestive aid
  • Helps relieve muscle and joint pain
  • Powerful antidepressant
  • Releases emotional pain

Bergamot and Depression

Depression can manifest itself with many different symptoms that include feelings of helplessness, sad mood, fatigue, low sex drive, disinterest in common activities, lack of appetite and other symptoms. Research conducted by Tang, et al (2014) expounds on the antidepressant properties of bergamot.A study was conducted on an aging population who experienced depression about pain that they were experiencing.

After treatment with bergamot during aromatherapy, a significant reduction in negative emotions were observed by the researchers.

Bergamot allergic reactions and precautions

As with any essential oil, bergamot can irritate the skin unless it is used with a carrier oil for dilution. In some cases, bergamot can cause photosensitivity of the skin, so avoidance of the sun is recommended.

People with a history of or who are showing signs of melanoma should avoid using bergamot oil.According to LiveStrong.com, bergamot oil containing bergapten, may lower potassium levels in the body, leading to muscle cramps.

Resource links

https://www.annmariegianni.com/bergamot-essential-oil-facts

http://bergamot-oil.com/category/history-and-origin

http://blog.mountainroseherbs.com/citrus-essential-oils-cold-expression

https://draxe.com/bergamot-oil/

http://hartonweb.com/nsp-herbs/goodhealthherbs.com/?sn=3840-8

http://www.livestrong.com/article/116277-side-effects-bergamot-oil/

Tang, Shuk Kwan, and M. Y. Mimi Tse. “Aromatherapy: Does It Help to Relieve Pain, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Community-Dwelling Older Persons?” BioMed Research International 2014 (2014): 430195. PMC. Web. 17 Mar. 2017.

The distinctive flavor and aroma of world famous Earl Grey tea comes from a wrinkled orange-like fruit called bergamot, or citrus bergamia. The fruit has a notable citrus-like aroma with spicy undertones. This same fruit is used to create a highly acclaimed essential oil, which has many therapeutic benefits.

Piper Nigrum Black Pepper Essential Oil Benefits


Black Pepper Essential Oil

In recent years, researchers have explored the many benefits of piperine, or black pepper essential oil, which has the ability to protect against oxidative damage and to enhance the digestive system. Black pepper essential oil is also used to enhance mental clarity and to invigorate the senses. Athletes often use it for its energizing, warming properties. According to Butt, et al, (2013), research suggests that the active ingredients in black pepper might also play a role in the control of tumor progression.

History

The word pepper comes from the Latin word, “piper.” This was taken borrowed from the Sanskrit word, “pippali.” Black pepper essential oil comes from the piperine plant, which originated in the forests of Indonesia, China, Madagascar, India and Malaysia. It has been used since the Ancient Greeks and Romans. Archaeological evidence suggests that pepper usage dates back to at least 2000 B.C. in India.

The piperine plant is a woody climbing vine that uses trees to grow to approximately 20 feet high. Cultivators of this plant generally trim it to around 12 feet for commercial purposes. Piperine plants have a lifespan of around 20 years.

Today, black pepper essential oil is made primarily in Singapore, Malaysia and India. The unripe peppercorns (fruit) are used for the extraction of the oil after they have dried in the sun. The steam distillation method is used for oil extraction, which produces a yield of approximately 2%.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil. Arborvitae essential oil is extracted using this method.

Uses for Black Pepper Essential Oil

According to Dr. Axe of Food is Medicine, black pepper essential oil can be used for the following:

  • Relief of aches and pains
  • Digestive aid
  • Cholesterol lowering agent
  • Antiviral
  • Antimicrobial
  • Increases circulation
  • Demonstrates anticancer activity
  • Relieves cigarette cravings
  • Eases anxiety
  • Works as a detoxifier
  • Stimulates the appetite
  • Food preservative
  • Food spice

Black pepper essential oil may be diffused at home, inhaled directly from the bottle, taken internally in small doses and applied topically. It is important to purchase only highest quality, 100% pure grade black pepper essential oil to get the most benefits.

When applied to the skin, black pepper oil results in a pleasant warming sensation. Therefore, it is wise to use small doses that have been diluted with a carrier oil. Use a 1 to 1 ration of black pepper oil to carrier oil.

Therapeutic properties

Black pepper oil includes the following therapeutic properties:

  • Antiseptic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Rubefacient and tonic for the spleen
  • Laxative
  • Febrifuge
  • Digestive aid
  • Diuretic
  • Diaphoretic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Antitoxic
  • Analgesic

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

Caution should be exercised when using black pepper essential oil, because in some cases, it can irritate sensitive skin. People with liver or kidney diseases should avoid this oil, as should pregnant or nursing women. Topical use of the oil works best when mixed with a carrier oil, such as jojoba or sweet almond oil. Do not ingest black pepper oil internally without first consulting a doctor.

Resource links

http://essentialoils.co.za/essential-oils/black-pepper.htm

https://draxe.com/black-pepper-essential-oil/

https://tinyurl.com/n5byw7w

​Butt, MS, Pasha, I, Sultan, MT, Randhawa, MA, Saeed, F, Ahmed, W. 2013;53(9):875-86. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2011.571799. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr.

Black pepper and health claims; a comprehensive treatise.

In recent years, researchers have explored the many benefits of piperine, or black pepper essential oil, which has the ability to protect against oxidative damage and to enhance the digestive system. Black pepper essential oil is also used to enhance mental clarity and to invigorate the senses.

The Warm Spicy Naturally Sweet Basil Essential Oil


Basil

Sweeet basil, or Ocimum basilicum L, is part of the Lamiaceae or mint plant family, which includes approximately 200 species of basil botanical varieties grown the world over. With a warm, spicy, naturally sweet, herbal aroma, basil essential oil can be used in many different ways both internally and topically.

There are many reported health benefits that go hand-in-hand with using basil essential oil. These include its ability to treat motion sickness, constipation, nausea, respiratory problems and diabetes, among others. The oil is rich in calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium and Vitamin A.

The important medicinal parts of basil are the leaves and seeds.

Basil essential oil is used extensively in Central Asia, Southeast Asia, India, Europe and Central Asia. Basil is use only for culinary purposes in the Mediterranean territories, and is still a large part of many Italian recipes.

Basil is also thought to have many health-promoting properties and is full of essential vitamins, such as K, C and A. It also contains minerals, such as manganese, and iron, magnesium, folate and omega-e fatty acids. According to Orafidiya, et al, ( 2001), basil essential oil is also an effective topical antibiotic.

History

Currently cultivated throughout the United States and Europe, basil originated in the Pacific Island and tropical Asia. The basil plant is an annual that grows up to 3' tall. Depending on its species, the plant has flowers that range from pink to white. It attracts bees during summer and is often planted for this purpose.

The word, basil, or basilicum, is derrived from the Greek word 'Basilicos', which translates to 'royal' or 'king'. Quite popular in India, basil is held sacred to Vishnu and Krishna . The leaves are sometimes chewed prior to participation in religious ceremonies. Basil is reported to have protective qualities, and is used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine.

Ancient Egyptians used it as a medicine for scorpion stings and snakebites. Roman naturalist, Pliny the Elder, recommended a basil tea as a cure for nervous conditions, fainting spells and headaches. The oil is extracted by steam distillation from the flowering tops and leaves of the basil plant.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil. Arborvitae essential oil is extracted using this method.

Uses for Basil Essential Oil

To use basil essential oil, dilute a single drop with a drop of carrier oil and apply to desired area as needed. The oil can also be diffused for up to half an hour, three times a day.

  • As a tonic for nervous disorders
  • Stress related headaches
  • Allergies
  • Migraines
  • Relief for intellectual fatigue
  • Clarity
  • Mental strength
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Soap making
  • Bee stings
  • Earache
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Vertigo

Blending with Basil

Oils that blend well with basil essential oils are:

  • Bergamot
  • Cedarwood
  • Black pepper
  • Ginger
  • Geranium
  • Lavender
  • Lemon
  • Verbena
  • Neroli
  • Marjoram

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

Basil essential oil should not be used on children under 16 years. Since it also have emmenagogue properties, it should not be used during pregnancy. Basil essential oil should be used with caution on people who have sensitive skin.

Sweet basil, or Ocimum basilicum L, is part of the Lamiaceae or mint plant family, which includes approximately 200 species of basil botanical varieties grown the world over. With a warm, spicy, naturally sweet, herbal aroma, basil essential oil can be used in many different ways both internally and topically.

 

Arborvitae the Tree of Life


The Tree of Life

Arborvitae essential oil comes from an evergreen coniferous tree that is also known as the Thuja Plicata tree or “Tree of Life”. It is part of the cypress family native to the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada. The sturdy wood from the arborvitae tree resists attack by insects, fungi and weather, and is used as building materials as a construction material, usually for doors, windows and panelling of walls and ceilings, and as veneer.

When arborvitae trees die, they can remain in tact for more than 100 years before beginning to deteriorate. The organic properties of arborvitae trees have many highly valued, unique benefits. For instance, their essential oil has high levels of tropolone, which have powerful purifying properties. The essential oil has a deep, earthy aroma, and is collected via steam distillation of its bark, leaves and wood.

History

Arborvitae essential oil, also known as thuja occidentalis, has a lengthy history of use that dates back to the ancient Egyptians. They used it for embalming because of its anti-fungal properties.

The arborvitae (or thuja Plicata) tree's essences, powders, wood and shavings were used in early anti-moth bags and in potpourris. During ancient times, the wood of the arborvitae tree was burnt as a sacrifice to the gods. It has been a prominent part of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Homeopathy for many years.

Arborvitae oil was once celebrated as a powerful treatment for scurvy. Native Canadians used the needles of the tree to prepare a special tea that was claimed to contain high volumes of vitamin C. This tea was also used as an effective remedy for treating menstrual pain and rheumatism. Arborvitae is also used in phytotherapy to treat angina, bronchitis, chronic and acute infections of the upper respiratory system and pharyngitis.

Indigenous to northeastern parts of North America, thuja or arborvitae essential oil is said to have been used by Native Americans to treat gout, insomnia, colds, eczema and dandruff.

The leaves were also prepared and used in a decoction for treating congestion, colds, intestinal parasites, uterine carcinomas, headaches, cystitis, stomach pain, and fever.

What is steam distillation?

Extracting essential oils by steam distillation takes place three different ways:

  • Straight steam
  • Water distillation
  • Steam/water distillation

Extracting essential oils using straight steam entails forcing steam through the plant material, then collecting the oil.

Water distillation is the method used when plant material is submerged into boiling water. The oils and steam are physically captured, then separated. Essential oils are the result.

The steam/water distillation method of essential oil extraction take place when water and steam are pushed through and around the plant material. As the oils and steam are collected, they are separated to produce the essential oil. Arborvitae essential oil is extracted using this method.

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Uses for Arborvitae Essential Oil

The aroma of arborvitae essential oil smells like a fresh cypress tree forest. If you prefer woody scents you will probably be attracted to this oil. The oil has many different uses, some of which are:

  • Acts as a purifying agent.
  • Offers protection against environmental threats.
  • Repels insects.
  • Protects against seasonal viral infections.
  • Preserves wood.
  • Can be used as a wood polish when mixes with lemon and carrier oil.
  • When added to water, can act as a hand sanitizer.
  • When diffused, can purify air.
  • Used as a grounding agent when diffused.
  • Instills sense of peace and calm during meditation.
  • Can be mixed with mulch while gardening.
  • Used as an ingredient in cologne.
  • Used in soap making.

Blending with Arborvitae

The oils that blend best with arborvitae essential oil are:

  • Cinnamon bark
  • Birch
  • Cedarwood
  • Eucalyptus

Allergic Reactions and Precautions

Individual with allergies to cedarwood and cedar products should avoid arborvitae oil. It should also be avoided during pregnancy.

Arborvitae essential oil comes from an evergreen coniferous tree that is also known as the Thuja Plicata tree or “Tree of Life”. It is part of the cypress family native to the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada. The sturdy wood from the arborvitae tree resists attack by insects, fungi…